laurenmichell (Lauren M. Rabaino)

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Here you will find the random musings of Lauren M. Rabaino (@laurenmichell on Twitter) that would be otherwise inappropriate for her personal blog. Enjoy.

Product management learn #4. The side of the user is the side you take, always. Only this.

Product management learn #4. The side of the user is the side you take, always. Only this.

— 5 months ago with 1 note
Product management learn #3. Trust your gut. If something doesn’t look/feel/sound/seem right, ask more questions. It can’t hurt to have the conversation.

Product management learn #3. Trust your gut. If something doesn’t look/feel/sound/seem right, ask more questions. It can’t hurt to have the conversation.

— 5 months ago
Product management learn No. 2. Over prepare always. Ask questions. Read more. Think ahead. Be early.

Product management learn No. 2. Over prepare always. Ask questions. Read more. Think ahead. Be early.

— 5 months ago
Lesson #1 learned in product management. It’s your job to make sure other people know what their job is. Trust them to do it, but only after you’ve done your part in articulating its importance and giving people a path to succeed.

Lesson #1 learned in product management. It’s your job to make sure other people know what their job is. Trust them to do it, but only after you’ve done your part in articulating its importance and giving people a path to succeed.

— 5 months ago
Hi

I’m a product manager now. I might try this thing where I post things I’m learning about PM on the daily. But don’t hold me to it because I work a lot of 14-hour days followed by immediately passing out so I might just, you know, stop caring about what I just said I’d try to do in this post.

Bye.

— 5 months ago with 2 notes
sunfoundation:

via Slate: The 7,000 streams that become the Mississippi River.

 A new online tool released by the Department of the Interior this week allows users to select any major stream and trace it up to its sources or down to its watershed. The above map, exported from the tool, highlights all the major tributaries that feed into the Mississippi River, illustrating the river’s huge catchment area of approximately 1.15 million square miles, or 37 percent of the land area of the continental U.S. Use the tool to see where the streams around you are getting their water (and pollution).

sunfoundation:

via Slate: The 7,000 streams that become the Mississippi River.

 A new online tool released by the Department of the Interior this week allows users to select any major stream and trace it up to its sources or down to its watershed. The above map, exported from the tool, highlights all the major tributaries that feed into the Mississippi River, illustrating the river’s huge catchment area of approximately 1.15 million square miles, or 37 percent of the land area of the continental U.S. Use the tool to see where the streams around you are getting their water (and pollution).

(via npr)

— 1 year ago with 1045 notes
I hadn’t seen this when it originally launched, but was thinking that it would have been great to have it. Boston Globe was a step a head of me. This interactive lets readers add their own story based on where they were. Very cool. 

I hadn’t seen this when it originally launched, but was thinking that it would have been great to have it. Boston Globe was a step a head of me. This interactive lets readers add their own story based on where they were. Very cool. 

— 1 year ago
LA Times did a great job making a ton of heavy data easy, accessible, fun and shareable. Home run!

LA Times did a great job making a ton of heavy data easy, accessible, fun and shareable. Home run!

— 1 year ago
I like this approach for showing a complex network web: Rather than displaying it all at once (which doesn’t tell a story), sort a list and only show selected section of the web at a time. 
Source: The Guardian, via Brian Boyer.

I like this approach for showing a complex network web: Rather than displaying it all at once (which doesn’t tell a story), sort a list and only show selected section of the web at a time. 

Source: The Guardian, via Brian Boyer.

— 1 year ago
#interactives 
Compare the viz on the top to the one on the bottom. Both serve the same basic function: applying a set of filters to manipulate data on a map. Both are heat-map-like in that they’re using a colored key to represent a frequency of something. 
Which one is more usable? I can’t even figure out how to use the second version. 
Takeaways:
Clickable filters over dropdown menus
Less information is more. Normal consumers aren’t researches who want to dig into every possible facet of the information. Pick the best stuff so they don’t get lost.
Source - NYT
Source- Seattle Times

Compare the viz on the top to the one on the bottom. Both serve the same basic function: applying a set of filters to manipulate data on a map. Both are heat-map-like in that they’re using a colored key to represent a frequency of something. 

Which one is more usable? I can’t even figure out how to use the second version. 

Takeaways:

  • Clickable filters over dropdown menus
  • Less information is more. Normal consumers aren’t researches who want to dig into every possible facet of the information. Pick the best stuff so they don’t get lost.

Source - NYT

Source- Seattle Times

— 1 year ago with 1 note
#dataviz  #user interface 
Yet another example from the NYT, this time an example of what not to do. As more newspapers are putting up paywalls, it’s important to remember to respect the users that already pay. Sure, with this popup they’re targeting people who may not already pay for a digital subscription, but for those who do, make the login button easy to find. I don’t see it anywhere on this popup.

Yet another example from the NYT, this time an example of what not to do. As more newspapers are putting up paywalls, it’s important to remember to respect the users that already pay. Sure, with this popup they’re targeting people who may not already pay for a digital subscription, but for those who do, make the login button easy to find. I don’t see it anywhere on this popup.

— 1 year ago with 1 note
#nytimes  #registration  #paywall  #user experience  #login 
Another one from the NYT.  It’s such a dead-simple concept, but further proof that not everything has to be crazy and flash and interactive. Less is more. Pull the lever, see impact. Simple, visual demonstration of cause and effect. 
Source

Another one from the NYT.  It’s such a dead-simple concept, but further proof that not everything has to be crazy and flash and interactive. Less is more. Pull the lever, see impact. Simple, visual demonstration of cause and effect. 

Source

— 1 year ago with 2 notes
#nytimes  #interactive  #cause and effect 
NYT does it a lot and I’m going to copy it for something, someday. It takes a lot of complex info, segments it into header sections, and gives you a sticky nav that highlights the newest section as you scroll through. It’s a way of guiding you through content and helping you keep your place as you scroll in context of the whole page. 
Source

NYT does it a lot and I’m going to copy it for something, someday. It takes a lot of complex info, segments it into header sections, and gives you a sticky nav that highlights the newest section as you scroll through. It’s a way of guiding you through content and helping you keep your place as you scroll in context of the whole page. 

Source

— 1 year ago
#navigation  #leading you through the story  #explanatory  #nytimes 
One of my favorite parts of Engadget’s latest redesign is this extremely useful “reviews” page. Utility-based design that gets beyond simple excerpts as a way of summarizing a content item.

One of my favorite parts of Engadget’s latest redesign is this extremely useful “reviews” page. Utility-based design that gets beyond simple excerpts as a way of summarizing a content item.

— 1 year ago with 1 note
First Impressions of Trove, WaPo’s News Aggregation Tool - 10,000 Words →

Really appreciate this note from the WaPo Chief Digital Officer, Vijay Ravindran on my blog post. 

ravindran:

Great thoughtful review of Trove on Media Bistro. Critique is totally fair and exactly pointing the in the direction we’re going.

— 3 years ago with 3 notes