laurenmichell (Lauren M. Rabaino)

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Here you will find the random musings of Lauren M. Rabaino (@laurenmichell on Twitter) that would be otherwise inappropriate for her personal blog. Enjoy.

drewvigal:

Nerdgasm! Star Wars Drawings Made Only With Type
Nicely done. I’d buy one… if H-57 negotiates a settlement.

drewvigal:

Nerdgasm! Star Wars Drawings Made Only With Type

Nicely done. I’d buy one… if H-57 negotiates a settlement.

— 3 years ago with 13 notes
"Success isn’t about achieving something in the future, but about doing something right now that you love."
Leo Babauta, ZenHabits.com, Oct. 18, 2010 (via michelleminkoff)
— 3 years ago with 3 notes
Vimeo has a new (or at least I *think* it’s new) “Watch Later” feature. Very insta-papery. All news content items should have this option, whether it’s text, video, slideshow, etc. 

Vimeo has a new (or at least I *think* it’s new) “Watch Later” feature. Very insta-papery. All news content items should have this option, whether it’s text, video, slideshow, etc. 

— 3 years ago with 1 note
#features,  #design,  #ideas  #functionality  #buttons  #ux  #ui 
Another example of a blog design that could be well-adapted to a news website. 

Another example of a blog design that could be well-adapted to a news website. 

— 3 years ago with 1 note
#well desinged,  #web design  #inspiration  #ideas  #blogs  #snd 
Brooks in Beta: 4 sins of news design reveals biggest sin: web co-opted print content, but not print's soul →

jaketbrooks:

Designer Lauren M. Rabaino (she of the redesigned PressThink.org) expounds on the 4 sins of news design, which are as follows:

1. Clutter.

2. Clutter.

3. Clutter.

4. Clutter.

She has a point, no? If the design of news sites are failing, they are failing precising because they fail to do…

(Source: jaketbrooks)

— 3 years ago with 16 notes
jaketbrooks:

So NYU professor and media critic Jay Rosen finally got around to redesigning PressThink, his blog where he expounds on the “ghost of democracy in the media machine.” The new design by Lauren Michell Rabaino is tight and sharp—a vast, vast improvement over its predecessor.
The design features one beautifully simple (from the user’s perspective), yet remarkably innovative function: paragraph-level permalinks (circled above). Jay likes to write—he also likes to Tweet, Tumbl, etc. These permalinks allow him and any one of his many followers to pick apart his long-form articles and comment. Simple, yet, dare I say it, brilliant!
I know their not new—the developer’s post about the code behind paragraph-level permalinks is dated Feb. 2010—and I don’t want to geek out ad nauseum. But I just love how a small, simple idea can have such a transformative effect on content.

jaketbrooks:

So NYU professor and media critic Jay Rosen finally got around to redesigning PressThink, his blog where he expounds on the “ghost of democracy in the media machine.” The new design by Lauren Michell Rabaino is tight and sharp—a vast, vast improvement over its predecessor.

The design features one beautifully simple (from the user’s perspective), yet remarkably innovative function: paragraph-level permalinks (circled above). Jay likes to write—he also likes to Tweet, Tumbl, etc. These permalinks allow him and any one of his many followers to pick apart his long-form articles and comment. Simple, yet, dare I say it, brilliant!

I know their not new—the developer’s post about the code behind paragraph-level permalinks is dated Feb. 2010—and I don’t want to geek out ad nauseum. But I just love how a small, simple idea can have such a transformative effect on content.

(Source: jaketbrooks)

— 3 years ago with 9 notes
Blog design should contain minimal distractions

And heck, while we’re at it — so should news design, since essentially, they’re the same: both ways to consume content. If news design wants to mimic digestibility of blogs, they would copy the same concepts. Stumbled upon this post this morning and fell in love with how damn clean it is:

Inridea Clean Design with Comments

Specific likes of this design:

  • + Simple, clean logo
  • + Huge, visually-appealing background image (fixed)
  • + Minimal distractions on the actual body itself. No sidebar. Just a little sliver with a date and “share” items
  • + Easy-to-find social media and subscribe buttons
— 3 years ago with 2 notes
#blog design  #clean  #nav  #visual backgrounds 
Stole this style of css markup from @ahemhill. I dig it.

Stole this style of css markup from @ahemhill. I dig it.

— 3 years ago with 4 notes
#markup,  #techniques  #css  #stylesheets 
New theory about company taglines

If it’s not something I’d wear on a t-shirt, it’s not simple and compelling enough. Best example off the top of my head: Socialcast. Their motto: Knowledge is social. That’s spiffy. It’s a good basic threshold for determining the effectiveness of the message you’re trying to convey to both the general public and potential customers:

Knowledge is Social

(Source: socialcast.com)

— 3 years ago with 2 notes
#mottos  #knowledge is social  #taglines  #theories  #socialcast  #company planning 
I love this “speed dial” concept on Recovery.org. There’s a big “Looking for?” button over which you can hover to choose who you are or what you’re seeking. It’s a quick navigation element, broken down with a different hierarchy than the main nav. 
If we were to use this in new design, the “Who are you?” could be broken down by profession:
Working Professional
Student - College
Student K-12
Parent
Retired
and choosing one of the options would filter the news down to what’s relevant to that particular age group.
You could also do the “What are you looking for?” concept, which for news could be something like:
Events
Data
An overview of today’s news
+ Set your own filter (which would allow for customizability).
Just a few ideas.

I love this “speed dial” concept on Recovery.org. There’s a big “Looking for?” button over which you can hover to choose who you are or what you’re seeking. It’s a quick navigation element, broken down with a different hierarchy than the main nav. 

If we were to use this in new design, the “Who are you?” could be broken down by profession:

  • Working Professional
  • Student - College
  • Student K-12
  • Parent
  • Retired

and choosing one of the options would filter the news down to what’s relevant to that particular age group.

You could also do the “What are you looking for?” concept, which for news could be something like:

  • Events
  • Data
  • An overview of today’s news
  • + Set your own filter (which would allow for customizability).

Just a few ideas.

— 3 years ago with 2 notes
#navigation  #new ideas 
I really like how hovering over a lefthand menu item on GOOD’s site highlights the active element across the entire page. There are only a few instances in which this could actually work and GOOD pulls it off well. 

I really like how hovering over a lefthand menu item on GOOD’s site highlights the active element across the entire page. There are only a few instances in which this could actually work and GOOD pulls it off well. 

— 3 years ago with 1 note
#navigation  #hover  #css 
Stumbled across this blog at Less Everything and I love the design. I might copy elements of it for my personal site. 
Love:
Lefthand navigation
Color scheme
Simplicity. Not a lot of clutter in the sidebars
No header. The title of the post is the dominant part of the layout.

Stumbled across this blog at Less Everything and I love the design. I might copy elements of it for my personal site. 

Love:

  • Lefthand navigation
  • Color scheme
  • Simplicity. Not a lot of clutter in the sidebars
  • No header. The title of the post is the dominant part of the layout.
— 3 years ago
#blog designs,  #navigation  #headers  #article landing page ideas